Posts Tagged ‘Brett Jones’

Hello everyone.  Hope you are training with integrity, grace, and a bit of humility.  I am just finishing up my training for RKC Level 2 and Dan John is so correct that the training “is about the journey, not the destination”.  I have learned so much about myself and how to not only properly train myself, but others to achieve their health and fitness goals.

I want to review to you an extremely valuable DVD and tool called Kettlebells from the Ground Up 2-Advanced Corrections.  This DVD was performed by Brett Jones, Dr. Mark Cheng, and Jeff O’Connor.  This is a step in the progression from the Kalos Sthenos 1 DVD set performed by Brett Jones and Gray Cook.

In the Kalos Sthenos 1 DVD and video progression, in my mind, it went on the progression of using the Turkish Get Up as a very valuable evaluation tool toward asymmetry and how to work on each specific step of the Turkish Get Up towards the goal of fluidity and balance.  Also included in the KS1 DVD are very valuable information and drills that I have personally seen do wonders for Shoulder Mobility & Stability as well as Rotary Stability.  It is a great way to use kettlebells to help clean up movement patterns.

The Kalos Sthenos 2 DVD takes the Turkish Get Up to another level.  It very nicely reviews the Turkish Get Up and involves some more progressions to help open up the shoulder (mobility).  What is the gem of the KS2 DVD is the Active Straight Leg Raise progressions/Hip Mobility drills.  These set drills do a fantastic job of working on the FMS Active Straight Leg Raise and Rotary Stability movements.

The small drills alone I have seen with my own eyes do wonders on improving hip mobility, ankle mobility, as well as making a huge impact on clients ASLR and RS scores.  Plus it is a type of Reactive Neuromuscular Training needed to help improvements to stick.

In my professional recommendation, I HIGHLY suggest that you purchase this video as it will do wonders for your patients and clients with kettlebell experience.  The drills in here can be done in a personal training format, in a class/team type setting as a warm up/cool down or FMS break, and also as something that the client or patient can be sent home with to do daily if they have kettlebells at home. It will make a DIRECT impact on your clients and how efficiently they move.

Right now you can purchase your own copy at Perform Better.



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Hello again everyone.  Hope all of you are doing well with your lives and training smart.

Today I want to review a DVD/Workbook combination by Master RKC Brett Jones and Gray Cook, RKC.  It is called Kettlebells from the Center: Dynami.

This workbook/DVD is a progression from the Secrets Series and Kalos Sthenos.  If you have not previously watched these before videos and workbooks I highly suggest to watch them as it makes a seemless transition into Dynami.  This workbook does a fantastic job of building your exercise skills through a proper progression.

Pattern Building>Slow Strength>Symmetry> and then Dynami (power).

Many of you may have heard that it speaks about the Kettlebell Swing and then its power counterpart, the Push Press.  But you would not believe how so much more is contained in this book.  They begin with the basics of movement as a great review that even includes often overlooked principles of movement screening and clearance tests to proper breathing (biomechanical and anatomic).

The DVD and workbook covers so many drills and progressions that are vital to myself not only as an individual but as an instructor.  I have progressed many individuals through the deadlift, swing and single leg deadlift much more efficiently with the use of the drills in this workbook/DVD.  SO MUCH is covered and it is great once again that I can see it on DVD and then be able to read the information and refer back to it in a workbook.

Items covered in Kettlebells from the Center (includes instruction, pattern building, slow strength, power and common mistakes)

  • Deadlift and variations
  • Swing and variations
  • Single leg deadlift and variations
  • Squat
  • Bottoms up squat
  • Press
  • Bottoms up press
  • Push Press
  • and Squat to Push Press
  • fantastic movement prep drills you have not seen anywhere else!

One thing I ABSOLUTELY LOVE about the bottoms up progression is that it is a fantastic way for you as an individual to address symmetry and be able to clean those things up.  Those of you going through the ROP ladders to get your clean and press numbers should really consider using some of the bottoms up progressions during your off weeks or your variety days to help you to address your symmetry.  You WILL notice that with these particular drills will help you improve quickly and avoid injury as well!

Again I highly suggest Dynami for you to purchase for yourself and for your clients.  All of you will greatly benefit from this series.  It is a must for those individuals who are training for RKC Level I and II to help you progress efficiently and get the strength you need to complete the requirements of your certification.

Hope everyone is dong very well. I just returned from a fantastic event, the RKC’s Certified Kettlebell Functional Movement Specialist Workshop. What a wonderful 4 days Nikki and I had with our RKC brother/sisterhood.

Throughout all the lectures, labs, and exercise breaks I started thinking to myself: “who would not want to be FMS screened and/or attend CK-FMS?”

Think about it for a second. For those of you who have trained for RKC level I or II, how many of you had to deal with some kind of setback/injury? How many of you when training or attending RKC was informed that your technique was sub par and really struggled with proper technique?

Did you ever think that your setback and/or injury may have been due to a limitation that may exist in your body? How about the thought that this limitation puts your body in a position that you cannot perform the RKC standard for exercise technique?

That is the beautiful thing about the FMS.
It sets a baseline that gives you an idea about what your limitations are (be it asymmetry or imbalance). It provides you with a proven method of correcting these limitations whether it be improving on mobility, stability and/or motor control.

The reason why I am talking about it is because I have seen it as well as experienced it. I have seen individuals training for HKC and RKC get setbacks in their training due to a limitation. I have seen those same individuals fail their certification because they would not take the time to work on that limitation.

I am no better!!! I had alot of trouble getting my snatch numbers as well as being able to demonstrate RKC competency in my press and snatch in the lockout position. I was very fortunate enough to understand my shoulder/thoracic limitation in my FMS score and addressed it during training and taking a step back from training to get my shoulder mobility score to where it needed to be. Then I slowly progressed back into proper technique with corrective exercise and help from my instructor Master RKC David Whitley.

So if you would consider some advice:

If you are planning on training and attending a RKC level I or HKC. Take the time to get a FMS and work with an RKC. Better yet, get with a CK-FMS and get the best of both worlds. Then you can make sure that you are limitation free and that your technique is solid.

If you are RKC Level I, attend CK-FMS. This is a terrific opportunity for you to better yourself as a Kettlebell instructor. Knowing your clients FMS score helps tremendously with guiding you as a RKC to determine what patterning will work best to get your clients training with proper technique. Remember what I said earlier, poor technique may be due to your client’s limitation

Also you are giving your clients more value to your training by helping to get them in fantastic shape AND prevent injury!

Nikki and Imade a very good decision and went to CK-FMS before attending RKC II.  This gives us all the tools to keep our limitations at bay and have the optimal ability to train for the rigors of Level II.  Also, another smart thing we have decided is to attend the Summit of Strength to help us get our technique on target to train limitation free and with solid technique!

NEW INFO:

Since we truly believe that the FMS is a very important system to have when training for ANYTHING, including HKC/RKC.  If you sign up through our affiliate link, you will get a free functional movement screen, corrective session and prep session.  HKC = 1 hour, RKC = 2 hours.

 Convict Conditioning How to Bust Free of All Weakness—Using the Lost Secrets of Supreme Survival Strength

Hello everyone out there, hope all of you are doing very well.

Today I wanted to give my review of a book that has been very popular among us in the RKC community.  Paul Wade is an ex con who spent a significant period of time behind bars.  His only means of keeping in shape and IMPROVING his strength was by learning from other veterans in prison and by using body weight exercises.  Not only was this a way for him to improve his strength but it was a way of training for survival.

The first part of the book gives a vivid picture about how “Convict Conditioning” came to be and how Paul survived behind bars in one of the toughest prisons.  He speaks in detail about the lost art of training (especially bodyweight training) in a world that resolves around making training easier by using machines, improper technique and shake weights :).

We are in a time an age where our generation on one end is trying to kick its ass into submission with no thought towards technique and the consequences the body will take, to the other end where we try to find the simple, least taxing method of training where there is no need for stabilization of the kinetic chain while training (machine weights).  Both of these systems disconnect the body, the one pushes the body too hard to where it is going into survival mode and technique is terrible, to the other where the load is not near enough and the set up only allows you to work one body part at a time.

The next part of the book he speaks on the “Big Six” movements: Pushups, Squats, Pullups, Leg Raises, Bridges and Handstand pushups. Not only does he paint a vivid picture about how the end goal should be but he also provides his “Ten Steps” approach to getting to the ultimate goal of strength.   This is an ideal approach for individuals, personal trainers/strength coaches, and rehabilitation specialists because he provides the proper progression to achieve proper strength.  In our classes we have used different steps of knee tucks, push ups, pull ups to correspond with the members skill level.  This allows our members to get the most out of their training without under/over training where load is not enough/or too much that technique may fail.

The nice thing about Convict Conditioning is that it takes a simplest approach to training the body as a whole.  Anyone can begin this approach to training from kids to senior citizens.  No extra load is applied and the body in a step by step approach is trained on how best to use its own body weight.  Isn’t that the way it should be?  The book also follows the same type of approach as the RKC system as where proper movement comes first instead of applying more load.

So I highly recommend that everyone/anyone purchase Convict Conditioning.  Very good read with good progressions.  It can be used like a workbook when you are working on progressions of your own and your clients.

If you need more recommendations try reading the ones by Pavel Tsatsouline, Brett Jones, and Gray Cook.