Posts Tagged ‘david whitley’

Hello everyone.  Hope you are training smart, plus taking care of yourself and the ones around you.

I want to start a discussion about achieving your 1/2 bodyweight press requirement for RKC Level 2.  From reading the RKC Forum and through speaking with individuals who have trained for RKC Level 2.  It seems the most common reoccurring theme for males were issues achieving the 1/2 bodyweight press requirement.

It seems that those who did not pass Level 2 certification could not achieve their 1/2 bw press and those who cancelled attending RKC Level 2 usually did due to some type of injury from training to achieve the 1/2 bw press.

I trained successfully for RKC Level 1 by performing Enter the Kettlebell Rite of Passage program of pressing ladders.  The ROP is a fantastic program for building a solid foundation for swings, cleans, and presses.  This was especially successful for building up my strength and endurance to achieve 5 double kb presses with a significant amount of weight (one of the requirements for passing RKC Level 1).

When I signed up for RKC Level 2 in August, I planned out all the requirements on a piece of paper and listed them from what would be the most challenging to achieve and that I felt I had a decent grasp upon.  I did this to determine how I would program my workouts to achieve all the RKC Level 2 requirements.  At the top of the list was the 1/2 bw press.

I decided to take a different approach to this requirement and not do the ROP clean and press ladders.  Instead I planned on doing a few different things to see if I could achieve this goal.

  1. Complete a Functional movement screen (every 4-6 weeks) to make sure that I am symmetrical and that my programming is taking me on the correct course (my baseline).
  2. Use bottoms up kb cleans, walks, squats, and pressing (self limiting exercises) to accomplish the proper alignment and technique to accomplish the press.
  3. Train for the press, pull up, and pistol by performing sets of 1 repetition.  Since that is what the requirement stated, I am going to train accordingly.

I brought up this plan of action to my mentor, Master RKC David Whitley, and he suggested an alternate route, the bent press.  As we were sitting there discussing my goals, he stated that the bent press is a way to achieve the type of mobility and stability necessary to achieve the 1/2 bw press.  Plus you get the opportunity to get heavy loads above your head and then train the pressing pattern eccentrically.  I was very intrigued by this idea and was willing to give it a try, but I had one problem.  I had no idea how to properly bent press.  David worked with me about a year before on my BP and I failed miserably.  At the time I did not have the type of mobility to achieve such a lift.

So David spent the next 45 minutes with me bodyweight patterning the bent press.  It was quite the learning experience and I cannot say enough of how fortunate I am to learn from the best.  David sent me home with some points of the bent press and told me “to practice”.  So for the next 10 weeks I made it a priority to improve my bent press to really see if it would have a carry over to the 1/2 bw press.  My previous heaviest kb press was the 36kg at RKC Level 1 (my performance baseline) so with the bent press I began with a 24kg to see if I could get the movement down.  The movement felt akward, and uncomfortable.  But in my experience that could necessarily mean that I am learning so I kept with it.  I got a lot of positive feedback just by videoing myself performing the bent press and then seeing the movement in my mind.

My 10 minute workouts throughout the day would go something like this:

  • Bent press 1/1 followed by single arm swing 5/5
  • I would review the video I did on my technique during my rest period
  • I would play out the proper movement in my mind, maybe even go through the motions with just bodyweight
  • Rinse and repeat

Once I felt I was no longer learning during my practice sessions, I would stop and do other things and then come back to the movement later that day or the next workout.  As I progressed within the movement, the 24kg no longer gave me the type of feedback that I needed to progress so I moved up in weight to the 28kg.  In not much time at all I progressed onto the 32kg bent press followed by single arm swings with the 32kg.

I still continued to video myself and occasionally sent the video onto David for some feedback.  I always tried to keep learning during this movement.  I learned along the way that if I achieved a new weight with the bent press that this new achievement did not mean that it was my new practice weight.  I needed to keep learning during practice and when my practice kb was no longer giving me the feedback I needed, then and only then, would I move up.

2 weeks ago I bent press the 44kg for 1 repetition on each side.  2 days later just to measure progress I was able to strict press the 40kg for the first time ever.  I was also able to bottoms up press the 24kg.  This is the type of progression I was looking for.  I am going up on my press weight and am not suffering from any shoulder/neck issues currently.  As a matter of fact, my shoulder mobility now is the most symmetrical it has ever been.

Some finer points I want to emphasize if you are planning on trying this method:

  • Get your FMS screen:  In my opinion there is a minimum requirement of mobility and stability to begin practicing the bent press.  When I tried it before and was so bad at it, I had not yet achieved that minimum standard and it was only when I got more symmetrical that the learning experience could include
  • The bent press is a SKILL just like all other lifts:  You need to get expert instruction and be willing to practice the skill.  It will be uncomfortable (but not painful!), it will be difficult, but you need to communicate with your body and keep making progress.  Stop the practice session when you are no longer making progress.

So my experiment is not yet done but I will continue to work on it and report on my progress.  As a matter of fact, after another one on one coaching session with the Iron Tamer himself, I achieved the 48kg bent press.  I still have some work to do but I know I am on the proper path as I have my baseline (my FMS score) and my strength continues to increase.

Would love to get some feedback from other individuals as how they achieved their press requirement for Level 2.  I am not saying that this is the only way to train for it, but it has worked very well for me and is something to consider especially if you have suffered from shoulder and neck issues in the past.

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Hello everyone.  Hope all of you are doing well and training smart.

Just a quick post on how things are going.  Had such a fantastic week training for RKC Level 2 certification last week.  I was able to press the 40kg on Tuesday, pistol both sides with a 16kg, and on Saturday I did my first bent press with a 44kg.  The 44kg felt really good as it was my first attempt at it but it went up quite smoothly.

Now the decisions I made next are crucial for me to be able to continue with my strength training foundation and to hit more PR’s.  The old me would have quickly ran over and tried to bent press the 48kg since the 44kg went so smooth.  I remember when I did this big jump before and I was able to perform it but a week later I had to take time off because I hurt my shoulder blade.  So I placed the 44kg down with happiness and left it at that.

My next decision is to lay off this week and really get to moving well.  I am taking the advice of many others who say not to keep hitting the accelerator when you hit a PR.  Every time I hit a PR it seems the next week I get hurt because I did not back off.  I was feeling so good last week and felt unbreakable, that is my hint that its time to back off and start the trek back up the peak slowly but surely next week.

Not that I am going to lay down on the couch or anything, but I am going to lighten the loads and really work on technique this week.

Goals this week: GREASE THE GROOVE

  • Bent Press practice with 32kg
  • 1 arm swings for sets of 5/5 with 32kg to build up grip strength for heavier kb cleans
  • Level 1 prep with 16kgs or 20kgs
  • Pistol practice with feet and knees together (more of a feet and knees together squat but it really helps my pistol)
  • Continue to work on thoracic mobility and ankle mobility
  • Own my rolling patterns
  • Kalos Sthenos on the Get Up (1 and 2)

As many of you may have read, in the past 2 weeks of my training I decided to revert back and work on some movement patterns and get back to basics.

  1. Been working the brettzel stretch and ankle mobility which was recently re-introduced to me by Master RKC, Jeff O’Connor.
  2. Went back to the beginning and relearned the drills for the bent press, pistol, and pull up.
  3. Then just started playing around with the level II drills here and there and just trying to OWN the movements.

Just yesterday Nikki and I decided to “play around a bit”.  I was extremely impressed by how going back to the basics and owning the movement patterns has made a big impact on my training.

  • Performed a pull ups on the bar
    • (1st set with 18#, and 2nd with 10kg: I know this is not much but I was doing them with a 16kg and decided that I was not finishing high enough on the bar so went back to basics)
  • Performed bottoms up press with a 24kg on both sides.
    • Very pleased with how seamless this felt and am looking forward to BU Pressing the 28kg soon
  • Performed some basic pistol work
    • Bottom position way more steady than before
  • Pressed the 40kg for the first time on my right side
    • Before yesterday, wasn’t able to get anywhere close to this.  Special thanks to MRKC David Whitley on his Bent Press Program to help me achieve this.  Now back to more bent pressing 🙂

Hopefully I have learned enough from previous bad habits of lift, lift more, lift heavier, lift even heavier then get hurt, rest and start over again.  Going to keep working those patterns daily and stay with the basics.  Here are my upcoming goals for the next 4 weeks.

  1. Continue to work on mobility (brettzels, ankle, soft tissue and rib pulls)
  2. Perform drills every day -Grease the Groove (some type of press for singles, some type of pistol or squat work, some type of pull up)
  3. Remind myself to taper when I get to the point that I feel indestructible then start back over at the basics.

Just started with Geoff Neupert’s New Nutrition Program so I will keep all of you posted.  Right now I am at 215 and would like to lose some body fat if at all possible to help me during this journey.  Don’t necessarily want to cut weight to press less, but if I end up losing some fat and staying strong in the process I won’t complain if I am asked to press the 44kg instead of the 48kg at RKC Level II.

 

Hello everyone! We have 5 RKC hopefuls that will be attending the Level I Russian Kettlebell Challenge Certification this summer and wanted to post some finer points on training for and passing the RKC snatch test.

1. Have a Functional Movement Screen

  • Yeah, Yeah, I know. I am the corrective guy. But think of it this way. You have an asymmetry that is inhibiting from you using your body at its finest. The metabolic load that you place on your body when you are banging up against an asymmetry can lead to gassing you out very very fast! Do not pass go beyond this point until you get screened and correct your asymmetries.
  • Example: I had a shoulder mobility issue. I was getting gassed and ripping up my hands when I first began training for the snatch test. I was basically catching the kb wrong (probably a no count half of the time) and the load it was putting on my system was too much let alone I was setting up my shoulder and neck for disaster. It wasn’t until I took a step back, worked on my shoulder mobility daily and worked on Kalos Sthenos Get Ups and overhead walks did I overcome my issues. Then the 100 snatches came naturally and I wasn’t as gassed!

2. Know the RULES of the snatch test!

  • Why would anyone ever want to train for the snatch test let alone test out without knowing the rules? That is beyond me!
  • Now that you looked up the rules, train like them.
    1. Get a timer that beeps on the minute
    2. Get someone to count for you and you go on their count and not your own pace
    3. If no one is around to count for you then, YOU count out loud at the top of every snatch
  • This will help prepare you for the snatch test and also will allow you a little rest break at the top

2. Have the snatch technique down first, THEN start pushing towards the Snatch test.

  • One of the biggest problems we see is too many individuals going after the snatch test with crappy form. Get the form down first with your snatch test weight, THEN move into the snatch test.
  • One method that has helped our hopefuls is from Phase II of Kettlebell Burn. Set a timer for 15 minutes and then perform 3 snatches on the Left, then 3 snatches on the Right. Then set the kettlbell down. Repeat and pace yourself. Go for perfecting technique. Video yourself to see if you need to fine tune anything.
    • This is a great way for women to move into using the 16kg for the first time and for men to progress to the 24kg. Then after you have mastered that particular weight, you can even progress to heavier bells on “variety days” to make the snatch test kb seem lighter and easier to handle
  • Another huge help for preparing for snatch test is the Enter the Kettlebell Rite of Passage and/or Kettlebell Burn. These programs help you to handle the 1 arm swing and being able to perfect this technique and handle the load with your snatch test kb will help you pass your snatch test.

3. Its not a sprint, think more of an 800 meter dash.

  • Pace yourself! I see too many hopefuls who fly through the first 20-30 and then are too gassed to finish. Find a pacing method that works best for you!
  • I like the 10/10 method. I do 10 snatches on my Left, then 10 on my Right and keep switching. If I feel I am getting a little to sloppy to get a good 10/10 then I switch to 5/5

4. Try not to set the kettlebell down.

  • Just eats up too much time. I have seen people do it and pass, but I prefer to rest at the top as needed. Then I don’t lose all the momentum I have started.
  • What works best for me is I work myself ahead of the timer. Example when the first minute beeps on the timer and say I am at 24 snatches, I am ahead of the timer. Then I use a little time to rest with the kettlebell at the top. Then I just keep going after that. This has been huge for me!

5. It’s all about the HIPS!

  • I am borrowing this from Master RKC, David Whitley. When people start to lose it towards the end of their snatch test they totally forget to use their hip snap to get the kettlebell overhead. I believe this has alot to do with the drop and throwback of the kettlebell. If you don’t throw the kb back far enough (on my video you should be able to see the handle of the 24kg on the backswing) which robs you of some important energy to get the kb back overhead.

There are some great videos and article posted by some of the best in the business that very much helped me with understanding the finer points of the kettlebell snatch. RKC Team Leader, Jordan Vezina (you tube averagetoelite), RKC Team Leader, Dr. Mark Cheng, and Master RKC, David Whitley (my big brother sort of speaking).

Here is a video of my snatch test I performed today where I tried to perform all the principles above.

Here is my 5 minute snatch test with some fine points mixed in. Hope this helps.

Hello everyone out there.  Hope you all are doing well and training smart.  Hope you are doing something to help exercise your mind, body and soul.  Just finished watching Tracy Reifkind’s Programming the Kettlebell Swing.

No one has done more with the kettlebell swing than Tracy Reifkind.  She is a visionary in the art of the kettlebell swing and the numerous ways you can perform swing variations and workouts.  Her DVD alone has provided me with some vital information about ways to change up things in our classes here at SG Human Performance.  From swing timing, on the minute swings, to the roundabout swing, Tracy provides many important drills and aspects to the swing that I would have never even thought of until I watched the DVD.  The roundabout swing idea alone is a solid drill for newcomers all the way to skilled RKC’s on perfecting their one arm swing.

IF you don’t want to take my word for it then I am sure you will listen to what Pavel has to say:

“If you searching a brutally effective fat loss and conditioning regimen, you have found it: Programming the Swing. I was so impressed with Tracy Reifkind’s innovations that I am incorporating some of them into the RKC curriculum.”


Anyone who is training clients and groups with kettlebell swings will greatly improve their programming by using her material.  I again think that this DVD along with Dave Whitley’s Deepening Your Get Up Skills and Mark Reifkind’s Lats the Super Muscles will provide you with vital information when training for your upcoming Hardstyle Kettlebell Certification and/or your Russian Kettlebell Certification.  I really would not see why you would not purchase the 4 disc set really.

Hello again everyone.  Hope the holiday season is treating you well and allowing you to look forward to spending some time with the ones you love.

Today’s blogpost is the 2nd in a 4 part series of DVD’s taken from a workshop that included Mark Reifkind, Tracy Reifkind and David Whitley.  Today I review the DVD, “Deepening Your Get Up Skills” by Master RKC David Whitley.

David has EXTENSIVE knowledge of many lifts.  It is his mastery of the Turkish Get Up that allows him to be able to perform and master the more extensive lifts.  He makes a very valid point that all kettlebell lifts has roots back to the get up and the swing.  Master the get up and the swing and then the clean, snatch, press, squat, and all RKC level II exercises will come much quicker and with less risk.

I feel that this DVD is is vital for those of you who are training for your Hardstyle Kettlebell Certification &/or your Russian Kettlebell Certification as it complements Enter the Kettlebell program in your training by teaching you the finer points of the RKC Turkish Get Up that you will be tested on at HKC/RKC.  Believe me I know!  I worked with David on my getup skills and performed many of the drills he has on this DVD.  When it came time for me to perform the Turkish Get Up at RKC in August of 2009 I was fortunate enough to receive a compliment on my technique by Pavel himself!  If you follow this video and work on your limitations in your get up, passing the technique portion of your HKC/RKC will not be an issue.

Secondly,  all the finer drills and cues that he uses in the video will help you to remember proper technique but will also allow you to be able to use them with your clients to help them understand & feel what proper technique in every stage of the TGU should feel like.

Last but not least I have a secret to tell you about with his DVD.  He also shows his mastery of the bent press.  Of all the RKC’s that I have worked with, David’s mastery of the bent press is hands down the best I have seen and he shows such precision in his technique.  He also gives VITAL drills to help master the bent press technique as well.

I highly recommend David’s DVD – Deepening Your Get Up Skills DVD and am really seeing how beneficial this DVD set would be to someone who is training for HKC/RKC and those of us who want to develop mastery of the lift as well as have those drills to help our clients perform the movement efficiently.  Every RKC/HKC (current and future) should have this set in their library.

Hello everyone.  I hope all of you had a good Thanksgiving weekend and have made sure to take time to reflect on all the things you have to be thankful for.  I sure did.

This blog is one of four reviews I will be doing of all 4 DVD’s that were just put out by Mark and Tracy Reifkind and David Whitley.  You would think naturally I would first review my mentor and long time coach Master RKC David Whitely, but actually I started with the DVD that I thought would help me to work on one of my weaknesses.  My shoulder stability and strength.

So naturally I began with Lats, the Super Muscles by Master RKC, Mark Reifkind.  Mark is extremely knowledgeable about injuries (he has had them), anatomy of the muscles and how they coordinate with each other, and really helped to explain to me how the Lats are a bridge between the upper and lower body.

His drills that he demonstrates within the DVD will help develop anyone’s kettlebell exercise technique.  The drills alone helped to improve my swing, ESPECIALLY my clean (weak point), and my press.  I will continue to revisit these drills to make sure that I am using my lats properly in my lifts.  They will be especially helpful in my training for RKC Level II (pull up, half bodyweight press and etc).

I truly believe that there are individuals out there that have a weak press or even a painful press that would greatly benefit from this DVD.  Besides for $29.95 it is a steal and should be in all RKC/HKC’s library collection.

Hello everyone!  Hope all is well with you and your families.

Was speaking to a client (and close friend) and we spoke about kettlebell training.  She commented on how good our technique was on the kettlebell swing.  I told her that it wasn’t always this way and that I am still always “tweaking” and practicing for the perfect rep.  She found that very hard to believe until I pulled out my iphone and showed her this video.  She was shocked.

All of you SGHP members out there enjoy this video and feel free to make fun of us as much as you would like. Take a look at the backwards hat, crappy swing (which made my back very sore) and are those running shoes?

This was our second week in David Whitley’s Kettlebell Class.  I was very naive and felt I had the kettlebell swing SO DOWN PAT that I took a video of it.  Boy was I wrong (and boy was I naive, sorry Dave!).

The point of the video is to show people that practice will help improve your technique (barring any imbalances or asymmetries that may exist, you should take care of those first).  As for myself, I struggled with figuring out the kettlebell swing.  Like with every dynamic movement, (example: dribbling a soccer ball, swinging a golf club, throwing a ball) it takes practice to get the desired result.  I hope this encourages all of you to see that with time, practice and patience you too can be where Nikki and I are at today.  (Notice Nikki was swinging a 12kg-orange and now she usually prefers to swing a 24kg-red or 28kg -orange/purple).  The same could be said for our squats and turkish get ups.  We spent a lot of time working on those drills, corrective exercises and practicing to get where we are now.  And we will still continually try to improve on technique.

The benefit that we had (and that our members have) is our kettlebell instructor was well trained with understanding the nuances of the kettlebell exercises and how to best teach us to improve on the swing.  You may get that from a DVD (preferably anything from Dragon Door.com) but more than likely you will not.  I thought I had everything down from the 15lb kettlebell and DVD I bought at a local store, but I was sorely mistaken.  I needed a Russian Kettlebell Certified Instructor to show me the correct way and how to get the most out of my kettlebell workouts.  I haven’t found anything close (other than the TRX) that provides so much bang for your buck.

The problem is that most trainers (including fitness celebrities) feel that they have the kettlebell swing down (and can teach it to anyone) because they have never been shown the absolute correct way to perform the swing.  If those trainers would do like we did and meet with an RKC professional then they would FEEL the difference between good technique versus poor technique.  They would feel how it works the backside (proper technique) instead of the frontside (incorrect technique).  They would understand the difference between proper load and not enough load.  These concepts I had no grasp of until I met with David and continued onto my progression (physically and mentally) to become RKC certified.

What is the big deal with technique you ask?  Here are some things to think about:

  • The RKC method teaches a step by step approach to kettlebell training.  This is the way we are suppossed to learn.  Most trainers will just start and end with the swing.  Is that how we learned to play a sport?  Is that how we learned to walk as toddlers?  No we learned step by step.
  • As Americans, we are too frontside loaded.  This leads us to imbalances, poor movement, injuries and poor health.  The RKC swing is training the backside.  The part of the body we tend to neglect and do not train nearly enough.
  • The RKC has way more bang for the buck.  More load.  Safer (MUCH SAFER). Better Workout.  Can prevent injury and pain (EVEN BACK PAIN, by getting you to fire your muscles the way you were made to)

Here is a nice little comparison video of my swing (just like the one up top) and then my swing after 12 weeks in kettlebell class with expert instruction.

So I hope that my words and the video has inspired you that you are on the right track towards your goals.  The true goal should be that you make small steps every day (this can be with your nutrition, training, movement, soul, etc) to be better than you were weeks and months before.

The Hardstyle Kettlebell Certification

Omaha, Nebraska

August 7th, 2010

If you look at the calendar now it is about  7 weeks until our first upcoming Hardstyle Kettlebell Certification here at SG Human Performance with Master RKC, David Whitley on August 7th, 2010.  We are very excited to be able to provide the Omaha area with a certification that teaches all the important aspects of Russian Kettlebell Training.

(Click Here for a list of all upcoming HKC’s)
HKC Certification

I would like to provide anyone who is interested in getting their HKC (or RKC for that matter) some important points to your upcoming certification.

  • The RKC/HKC method of certification is not just a show up to the certification, and walk out with a certificate.  YOU MUST EARN IT!  This is why I suggest that everyone train with an Russian Kettlebell Certified Instructor before attending the event.
    • This way you already have an understanding of the movement patterns needed to perform the kettlebell swing, turkish get up and goblet squat correctly.  Then you can practice at home or continue with your RKC until the day of the certification.  This will mean then you can fine tune your skills instead of having to begin from scratch.
    • There is about a 33% fail rate per certification, I believe this is due to individuals who felt they could pass just by showing up or by training on their own.
    • If you are in the Omaha/Council Bluffs and surrounding areas you are welcome to join our bootcamp to help you train plus we will be having some HKC prep sessions on Saturdays beginning 8 weeks before HKC.  For more information, email us at sghumanperformance@gmail.com
  • You have to be able to show the Master/Senior Instructor that you can TEACH as well as perform the required movements.  This includes being able to use the techniques shown that day to help your clients understand and perform the movements safely and correctly.  In the prep sessions we will cover and practice finer points of instruction.
  • For more details about the Hardstyle Kettlebell Certification and its requirements CLICK HERE.

Enter the Kettlebell Workshop

David Whitley, MRKC "The Iron Tamer"

On Sunday, August 8th from 10am to 2pm, David Whitley will teach the remainder of the “ETK” essential kettlebell exercises.  Sign Up Here for the workshop.  HKC Attendees recieve a $100 discount if they sign up before the day of the event.

Following exercises will be covered:
• Clean (Single & Double)
• Snatch
• Clean and Press (Single & Double)
• Clean and Squat (Single & Double)
• Turkish Get Up Variations
• Swing Variations

Hope everyone is dong very well. I just returned from a fantastic event, the RKC’s Certified Kettlebell Functional Movement Specialist Workshop. What a wonderful 4 days Nikki and I had with our RKC brother/sisterhood.

Throughout all the lectures, labs, and exercise breaks I started thinking to myself: “who would not want to be FMS screened and/or attend CK-FMS?”

Think about it for a second. For those of you who have trained for RKC level I or II, how many of you had to deal with some kind of setback/injury? How many of you when training or attending RKC was informed that your technique was sub par and really struggled with proper technique?

Did you ever think that your setback and/or injury may have been due to a limitation that may exist in your body? How about the thought that this limitation puts your body in a position that you cannot perform the RKC standard for exercise technique?

That is the beautiful thing about the FMS.
It sets a baseline that gives you an idea about what your limitations are (be it asymmetry or imbalance). It provides you with a proven method of correcting these limitations whether it be improving on mobility, stability and/or motor control.

The reason why I am talking about it is because I have seen it as well as experienced it. I have seen individuals training for HKC and RKC get setbacks in their training due to a limitation. I have seen those same individuals fail their certification because they would not take the time to work on that limitation.

I am no better!!! I had alot of trouble getting my snatch numbers as well as being able to demonstrate RKC competency in my press and snatch in the lockout position. I was very fortunate enough to understand my shoulder/thoracic limitation in my FMS score and addressed it during training and taking a step back from training to get my shoulder mobility score to where it needed to be. Then I slowly progressed back into proper technique with corrective exercise and help from my instructor Master RKC David Whitley.

So if you would consider some advice:

If you are planning on training and attending a RKC level I or HKC. Take the time to get a FMS and work with an RKC. Better yet, get with a CK-FMS and get the best of both worlds. Then you can make sure that you are limitation free and that your technique is solid.

If you are RKC Level I, attend CK-FMS. This is a terrific opportunity for you to better yourself as a Kettlebell instructor. Knowing your clients FMS score helps tremendously with guiding you as a RKC to determine what patterning will work best to get your clients training with proper technique. Remember what I said earlier, poor technique may be due to your client’s limitation

Also you are giving your clients more value to your training by helping to get them in fantastic shape AND prevent injury!

Nikki and Imade a very good decision and went to CK-FMS before attending RKC II.  This gives us all the tools to keep our limitations at bay and have the optimal ability to train for the rigors of Level II.  Also, another smart thing we have decided is to attend the Summit of Strength to help us get our technique on target to train limitation free and with solid technique!

NEW INFO:

Since we truly believe that the FMS is a very important system to have when training for ANYTHING, including HKC/RKC.  If you sign up through our affiliate link, you will get a free functional movement screen, corrective session and prep session.  HKC = 1 hour, RKC = 2 hours.